Agile Blog - Riter

​Though today’s post will be focused primarily on software development and pull requests in particular, it will also touch a few more common problems, such as co-working and task planning. Therefore, we encourage project managers to read it as well and share their own views on task management and splitting.
Hi there,

This is the fifth release of our monthly project management digest prepared primarily for project managers, product owners, and team leads. However, we’re looking to keep it interesting for everybody working in the IT field. The digest includes the most popular articles grouped by topics, the most discussed, controversial, and entertainment content, as well as general resources such as author blogs, educational materials, and active podcasts.

One of the most useful things when working on several projects simultaneously is common and similar tasks. It is completely obvious that the same functionality can be implemented once to save time on it in the future. Most software development teams use this in practice at every opportunity. In this post, we’d like to share own similar experience.
I know I’m preaching to the choir now, but a good programmer is distinguished from a bad one by efficiency. And the first thing that comes to mind when we hear the word “efficiency” is the time spent on implementing a particular feature. For example, when one developer does something in three days, and another one — in six days, then a small amount of arithmetic calculations reveals that the first developer is twice as effective as the second one, isn’t he?
I have already raised the issue in one of my previous posts, however, daily practice shows that the problem is still relevant. This time, I’ll also talk about paid programming courses which are so popular today. Lots of courses like “Learn PHP/Java/C++/... in a month/2 weeks/...” and high demand for them don’t allow me to just keep silent. Moreover, an enormous number of their advertising, exceeding reasonable limits, also do not allow to ignore this topic. So I will try to save a couple hundred dollars for those who want to dive into programming through courses.

— What are you working on now?
— I’m doing a project.
— What kind? Tell me, I’m curious.
— I can’t tell you anything now, you will see it later.

Some years ago, Jesse Newland presented “ChatOps at Github” — an open source chat bot Hubot for automating deployment, graphing, monitoring, provisioning, and many other things to enhance the culture of remote work. That was a beginning of ChatOps history, a new way to manage operations through a chat. Today it is not only about DevOps and deployment. Project managers and whoever else working in a software development team can also find use of it, and many of them already do.
Hi everybody,

This is the fourth release of our monthly project management digest focused primarily on materials and resources for project managers, product owners, and team leads. However, we’re looking to keep it interesting for everybody working in the IT field. The digest includes the most popular content grouped by topics, the most discussed, controversial, and entertainment articles, as well as general resources such as author blogs, educational materials, and active podcasts.

This is the third release of our monthly project management digest oriented primarily on project managers. However, everybody working in the IT field can find something useful here.